Israeli cuisine

Israeli cuisine (Hebrew: המטבח הישראלי‎) comprises local dishes by people native to Israel and dishes brought to Israel by Jews from the Diaspora. Since before the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, and particularly since the late 1970s, an Israeli Jewish fusion cuisine has developed. Israeli cuisine has adopted, and continues to adapt, elements of various styles of Jewish cuisine, particularly the Mizrahi, Sephardic, and Ashkenazi styles of cooking. It incorporates many foods traditionally eaten in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines, and foods such as falafel, hummus, shakshouka, couscous, and za'atar are now thought to be synonymous with Israeli cuisine.

Amba – Mango Pickle

A tangy mango pickle condiment popular in Middle Eastern cuisine. Use as a condiment for felafel, shawarma, poultry, fish or meat, a cheese sandwich or a lunch of strained Greek yoghurt and crisp flatbread.

Continue reading »

Falafel

Falafel is a deep-fried ball or patty made from ground chickpeas, fava beans, or both. Falafel is a traditional Middle Eastern food, usually served in a pita, which acts as a pocket, or wrapped in a flatbread known as lafa; “falafel” also frequently refers to a wrapped sandwich that is prepared in this way.

Continue reading »

Fattoush

A Levantine bread salad made from toasted or fried pieces of pita bread combined with mixed greens and other vegetables.

Continue reading »

Hamantaschen

A hamantash (or hamentasch), is a filled-pocket cookie or pastry in Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine recognisable for its three-cornered shape. The shape is achieved by folding in the sides of a circular piece of dough, with a filling placed in the centre. It is traditionally eaten during the Jewish holiday of Purim.

Continue reading »

Israeli Breakfast

An Israeli breakfast is a distinctive style of breakfast that originated on the Israeli collective farm called a kibbutz, and is now served at most hotels in Israel and many restaurants.

Continue reading »

Israeli Salad

Israeli salad is made of chopped raw tomato, onion and cucumber, and can also include pepper, carrot, spring onion (scallion), leafy greens and parsley. The salad is dressed with either fresh lemon juice or olive oil, or both.

Continue reading »

Saj Bread

Saj bread (also Markook, Markouk, Arabic:كماج، مرقوق، شراك) is a type of unleavened flatbread common in the countries of the Levant. It is baked on a domed or convex metal griddle, known as a saj.

Continue reading »

Shish Taouk

Şiş tavuk, Tavuk şiş or Shish taouk is a traditional Turkish shish (brochette), which can also be found in Syrian, Palestinian, Jordanian, Lebanese, Egyptian, Israeli and Iraqi cuisines, but is made in kabab houses in many cities around the world.

Continue reading »

Taboon Bread

Taboon bread is sold as street food, stuffed with hummus, falafel or shaved meat, and is a staple of Middle Eastern cuisine worldwide.

Continue reading »

Torshi Liteh – Eggplant and Herb Pickle

Torshi liteh is made with eggplants and herbs (parsley, coriander, mint, tarragon, basil). Eggplants are baked in the oven, put in a glass jar with herbs and vinegar, and stored in a cool, dry place for two to three months.

Continue reading »

Related Categories

Latest posts
 
11 Ways to Save Money and Stop Food Waste5-Spiced Pear MuffinsMango Pickle Aam Ka AchaarAam Papad - Mango Fruit LeatherPersian Summer Soup
 
Top 10 Recipes
 
Chicken ParmigianaClamato JuiceHow to Make Basic Fritter BatterKFC Pepper MayoOutback Steakhouses Steak SeasoningThe-Aussie-Egg-And-Bacon-Pizza
 
Food & Health
 
Annatto Benefits and Precautionsgreen potatoesBody Mass Index - BMIBrushing Your TeethCalciumVeges high in carotenoidsCiguatera PoisoningCulantro