Salsa Criolla – Onion, Pepper, and Lime Salsa


 


Onions, Aji­ Amarillo chillies, lemon juice and a few coriander leaves, a simple mix of intense flavour. Salsa criolla accompanies many Peruvian dishes as a side dish, like Tamales, Humitas, Arroz con pollo, sandwiches, beans, and the list goes on. It’s up to you how hot this salsa will be: you can follow the recipe word for word, or make it milder, by substituting the Aji­ Amarillo with capsicums. Make it colourful so it is visually appealing and keep the onion crunchy to fully enjoy its texture and awaken all your senses (for this you need to prepare the Salsa Criolla right before serving, as the onion becomes soggy when it macerates in the lime juice for too long).

Salsa Criolla - Peruvian Onion Pepper and Lime Salsa

Salsa Criolla - Onion, Pepper, and Lime Salsa

It’s up to you how hot this salsa will be: you can follow the recipe word for word, or make it milder, by substituting the Aji­ Amarillo with capsicums. Make it colourful so it is visually appealing and keep the onion crunchy to fully enjoy its texture and awaken all your senses (for this you need to prepare the Salsa Criolla right before serving, as the onion becomes soggy when it macerates in the lime juice for too long).
Course: Salsa
Cuisine: South American
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Author: The Cook
0 from 0 votes
Print Recipe Pin Recipe Rate this Recipe

Ingredients

  • ½ medium red onion, finely sliced
  • 1 Aji Amarillo chilli cut in thin slices, or ½ red capsicum <em>(see notes for Aji Amarillo chilli)</em>
  • 2 tablespoons fresh coriander (cilantro) leaves, chopped
  • salt and pepper
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

Recipe Instructions

  • Put the sliced onion in a bowl, cover with ice water and let rest for 5 minutes. Strain thoroughly. <em>(This is done to eliminate the bitterness of the onion)</em>.
  • In a bowl combine onion, Aji­ Amarillo or capsicum, salt, pepper, lime juice and olive oil. Mix carefully. You can use it immediately or have it on hand up to an hour in the fridge.

Cooks Notes & Variations

The habañero is a suitable substitute in Australia. The habañero ripens to a range of colours depending on the variety - reds, oranges, yellows and dark purple/browns are the most common. It's skin is smooth, shiny and undulating and the shape, though highly variable, are roughly the same.

Rate this Recipe

Nutrition

Serving : 0g | Calories : 0kcal | Carbohydrates : 0g | Protein : 0g | Fat : 0g | Saturated Fat : 0g | Polyunsaturated Fat : 0g | Monounsaturated Fat : 0g | Trans Fat : 0g | Cholesterol : 0mg | Sodium : 0mg | Potassium : 0mg | Fiber : 0g | Sugar : 0g | Vitamin A : 0% | Vitamin C : 0% | Calcium : 0% | Iron : 0%

2
Comments and Feedback

avatar

 
smilegrinwinkmrgreenneutraltwistedarrowshockunamusedcooleviloopsrazzrollcryeeklolmadsadexclamationquestionideahmmbegwhewchucklesillyenvyshutmouthapplausewhat-is-thatwell-donewant-a-tasteparty-animal
2 Comment threads
0 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
2 Comment authors
Rieta SweeneyRowan Robinson Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Rieta Sweeney
Guest

You can definitely add a bit of this and bit of that to make it your own… It all depends on personal taste! But this sounds absolutely delicious! grin

Rowan Robinson
Guest

If you want to perk up some bbq’d chicken this is the way to do it.

HERE