Skip to toolbar

Blue Mussels

Available farmed, this marine-dwelling bivalve mollusc is found in intertidal waters to depths of around 20m, often in dense clumps, attached by coarse rope-like ‘beards’ to exposed reefs, rocks and jetty pylons, and was traditionally harvested by divers off southern NSW, Victoria, SA and southern WA. Aquaculture commenced in NSW in 1976, and now all Blue Mussels sold commercially are farmed.

Australian Blue Mussels

Australian Blue Mussels

They are grown in southern NSW (around Eden), Victoria, Tasmania, SA and southern WA in clean, sheltered water 5-20m deep. The tiny immature Mussels (spat) are collected on ropes (mainly from the wild, although some are produced in hatcheries in Tasmania), raised in long ‘socks’ (to protect them from predators) suspended from horizontal ropes attached to buoys to keep them immersed (known as subtidal suspended culture) and harvested at 12-18 months. The dark (brown, grey, blue, purple or black), wedge-shaped shell with a bluish-white interior is easily distinguished from other bivalve molluscs such as Pipis and Cockles. They are the only commercial species of Mussel sold in quantity in Australia.

Buying Mussels :

Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, firm, intact, lustrous shells that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Tiny crabs are sometimes found inside Mussels, they are harmless and do not indicate any problem with the Mussel.

Storing Mussels :

Live shellfish should be consumed as soon as possible after purchase. Place in a container, cover with a damp cloth and keep in the warmest part of the refrigerator, usually the crisper (optimum 5ºC), ensuring that covering remains damp. Before cooking, discard any shells that are open and don’t close when tapped or gently squeezed (you may need to give them 10-20 minutes out of the fridge to warm up first). Freeze meat for up to 3 months below -18ºC.

Cooking Mussels :

If Mussels are being served in the shell, remove beards (byssal threads) before cooking by holding shells firmly closed and sharply tugging beards away from the pointy end of the shell; if Mussels are being removed from shells, cook with beards attached, they are easy to pull off the cooked Mussels once they’re removed from their shells. Lightly scrub shells with a plastic scourer to remove any sediment or barnacles. Average yield is 30%. They have a rich, strong flavour, high oiliness and moist, juicy, medium-textured flesh. Remove from the heat as soon as they open, as they quickly shrivel and become chewy if over cooked. While traditional wisdom was to discard shells that don’t open when cooked, you can pry them open, away from the plate, and, if they smell good, eat them; if they’re bad, they’ll have a distinctly ‘off’ aroma. All of the flesh is edible, females tend to be more orange in colour, whereas males are paler.

View Mussels Recipes

Best Cooking Methods For Mussels:

  • Steam, poach, deep-fry, pan-fry, stir-fry, bake, grill, barbecue, smoke, raw (sashimi), pickle.
  • The firm flesh holds together well in soups, curries and stir-fries.

Mussels Go Well With:

  • Bacon, breadcrumbs, butter, chilli, coriander, fennel, garlic, herbs, lemon, lime, mayonnaise, olive oil, onion, parsley, pepper, Pernod, potatoes, saffron, tomato, white wine.

Mussels Substitutes :

  • Pipis – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Due to their sandy habitat they can contain quite a bit of grit, ask your fishmonger if they have been purged (stored in aerated saltwater for at least 24 hours to eliminate sand), if they haven’t been, see purging instructions.
  • Surf Clams – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Due to their sandy habitat they can contain a bit of grit, ask your fishmonger if they have been purged (stored in aerated saltwater for at least 24 hours to eliminate sand), if they haven’t been, see purging instructions.
  • Vongole – Sold live. Look for brightly coloured, intact, lustrous shells, that are closed or close when tapped or gently squeezed, and a pleasant fresh sea smell. Due to their sandy habitat they can contain a bit of grit, ask your fishmonger if they have been purged (stored in aerated saltwater for at least 24 hours to eliminate sand), if they haven’t been, see purging instructions.

Imports:

  • Green mussels (Perna canaliculus, also known as green-lipped mussels), imported frozen from New Zealand, are generally larger (averaging 11cm and 60g).
  • They are partly cooked before being exported (to satisfy Australian quarantine requirements regarding the importation of live animals) and tend to go tough when recooked.

Nutritional Data

Blue Mussel Nutritional Data

Blue Mussel Nutritional Data

Comments via Facebook

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x
Send this to a friend
Hi There - We notice that you have an ad-blocker
Plenty of visitors do. All we ask is that you please consider sharing us or commenting on the post as a nice gesture.
Thank you for visiting The Taste of Aussie
Your Information will never be shared with any third party.
OR
Cooking is Easy
Do you like lobsters? We teach chefs to cook better. Subscribe now and get a free invitation to our cooking class!
We never share your data with 3rd parties.
2018 (С) All rights reserved.
Simple.
This is Photoshop's version of Lorem Ipsum. Proin gravida nibh vel velit auctor aliquet. Aenean sollicitudin, lorem quis bibendum auctor, nisi elit consequat ipsum.
2018 (C) All rights reserved.
{loginbox-username}
{loginbox-password}
{loginbox-remember}
{loginbox-submit}
Enter Your Details
Remember Me
Got Freebies?
Designer? Try our weekly freebies pack! Subscribe now and we will send you this week’s pack immediately.
Your Email
2016 (С) All rights reserved.
Enter Your Account
{loginbox-username}
{loginbox-password}
{loginbox-remember}
Remember Me
{recaptcha}
{loginbox-submit}
JOIN OUR COMMUNITY
Just one step to success!
Don't Miss Out!
Stay in touch with us by receiving our monthly newsletter of new recipes and related food posts.
Aussie Taste
Recipe Newsletter
Subscribe to our newsletter and keep up with our latest recipes and cooking information.
Subscribe Now
Fresh berries straight from da woods. Get a 50% discount by subscribing to our free newsletter.
Cooking is Easy
Do you like lobsters? We teach chefs to cook better. Subscribe now and get a free invitation to our cooking class!
We never share your data with 3rd parties.
2018 (С) All rights reserved.
Aussie Taste
Subscribe to our newsletter and get cooking help, food information, and wholesome healthy recipes
2017 (C) All rights reserved.
Aussie Taste Recipes
Enjoy our recipe newsletter with plenty of cooking information and straight forward recipes
Follow Us.
This is Photoshop's version of Lorem Ipsum. Proin gravida nibh vel velit auctor aliquet. Aenean sollicitudin, lorem quis bibendum auctot mauris. Morbi accumsan ipsum velit. Nam nec tellus a odio tincidunt auctor a ornare odio. Sed non taciti sociosqu.
2017 (C) All rights reserved.