Appenzeller


[cheese-label id=39409]

Appenzeller cheese is a hard cow’s-milk cheese produced in the Appenzell region of northeast Switzerland. A herbal brine, sometimes incorporating wine or cider, is applied to the wheels of cheese while they cure, which flavours and preserves the cheese while promoting the formation of a rind.[no_toc]

Appenzeller has a documented history of at least 700 years. Today, about 75 dairies produce it, each with a different recipe for their brine wash. Most of the recipes are trade secrets.

The cheese is straw-coloured, with tiny holes and a golden rind. It has a strong smell and a nutty or fruity flavour, which can range from mild to tangy, depending on how long it is aged. Three types are sold:

  • “Classic” – Aged three to four months, mildly spicy. The wheels are wrapped in a silver label.
  • “Surchoix” – Aged four to six months, strongly spicy. Gold label.
  • “Extra” – Aged six months or longer, extra spicy. Black label.
Appenzeller cheese is a hard cow's-milk cheese

Appenzeller

Substitutes

  • Emmental
  • Gruyere
  • Raclette
  • Fontina

Other Cheeses from Switzerland:

  • Hard Cheeses: Affineur Walo Le Gruyère AOC Extra Mature, Affineur Walo Rotwein Sennechäs, Challerhocker, Cremig Extra Würzig, Bergkäse Aus Dem Schweizer Jura, Emmental, Gruyere, Kaltbach Le Gruyère AOP, Piora, Rotwein Bärgler Extra-Würzig, Saanenkaese, Sbrinz
  • Semi-hard Cheeses: Fromage a Raclette, Kaltbach Emmentaler AOP, La Couronne – Fort Aged Comté, Royalp Tilsit, Sweet Style Swiss, Tete de Moine, Zartschmelzend, Kräftig Würziger Rahm-Hartkäse
  • Semi-soft Cheeses: Don Olivo, Forsterkase, Käse Mit Schweizer Trüffeln, Monastery Cheeses, Tommes, Vacherin Fribourgeois
  • Soft Cheeses: Emental Grand Cru, Monastery Cheeses, Tommes, Vacherin

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