Obi Non Flatbread

Obi non, or Lepyoshka, is a kind of flatbread pastry in Afghan and Uzbek cuisine. They are shaped like a disc and thicker than naan. Obi non are baked in special hand-built clay ovens called tandyr.

The splendid variety of pastries known as lepyoshkas play a prominent part in Uzbek cuisine. Lepyoshkas are mentioned in one of the world’s oldest written works, “Eros about Gylgamesh”, the legendary ruler of the Sumerians, who lived almost 5000 years ago. Lepyoshkas are baked in special clay ovens called tandir. While unearthing the Afrosiab archaeological site in Samarkand, finds included tandirs used by worshippers. Tandirs are hand – built.

They take the form of a cylinder with a narrow spout and two-centimeter thick walls made from mountain soil and camel or sheep hair. A finished tandir has to dry under the sun for a week. Sometimes big clay pitchers for wine, oil or grain are also used as tandirs. Tandirs are made in the yard under the awning and near the wall; the base of a tandir needs to touch the wall. A tandir’s opening is 1.5 m off the floor, just opposite the baker’s workplace.

Obi Non Flatbread

Obi non, or Lepyoshka, is a kind of flatbread pastry in Afghan and Uzbek cuisine. They are shaped like a disc and thicker than naan. Obi non are baked in special hand-built clay ovens called tandyr.
Author: The Cook
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Ingredients

  • 1 kg flour
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 40 g yeast

Recipe Instructions

  • Add the lukewarm water and flour, ½ cup at a time.
  • If necessary, beat in is as much of the remaining ½ cup of flour as you need to make a dough that does not stick to your fingers.
  • Gather the dough into a large, compact ball.
  • Divide dough into 150 – 200 g pieces and roll into balls.
  • Flatten into round bread, 2 – 3 cm at edges and 5 mm in the centre.
  • Make a pattern in the centre with a chekish.
  • Sprinkle water on the underside and bake in a tandoor.

Cooks Notes & Variations

Variations:
    Bukhara lepuoshkas, sprinkled with sesame or Nigella, exude a delicate aroma. This bread amazes you with its unique taste and healing power. Sesame causes the satiety and Nigella on the contrary whets the appetite.
    Wedding patir (flaky lepyoshka) from Andijan and Kashkadariya, According to ancient traditions this aromatic bread prepared with cream and butter was served during matchmaker meetings.
    Tashkent lochira, plate-formed lepyoshka, is baked from short pastry (milk, butter and sugar). Jirish nan is specially prepared bread made from flour mixed with bran; It is to this day used as a remedy for diabetes mellitus. Nomadic tribes didn't make tandirs because of their lifestyle. They cooked bread on butter in kazans (cauldrons), preparing the dough on a milk base. Particularly in the mountainous areas of Jizzak, kazan-patir is routinely enjoyed.

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