Bangers and Mash (aka Sausage and Mash)


 

Bangers and mash, also known as sausages and mash, is a traditional British dish made of mashed potatoes and sausages, the latter of which may consist of a variety of flavoured sausage made of pork or beef or a Cumberland sausage. It is sometimes served with onion gravy, fried onions, and baked beans.

This dish may, even when cooked at home, be thought of as an example of pub grub — relatively quick and easy to make in large quantities. More up-market varieties, with exotic sausages and mashes, are sold in gastropubs, as well as less exotic alternatives being available in regular public houses.

Along with jellied eels and pie and mash, the dish has particular iconic significance as traditional British working-class dishes. In the north, black pudding and leeks have a similar reputation.

In the United States, the ubiquitous Irish-themed ‘Pub’ will often feature the dish on its menu although there is no evidence that it is any more popular in Ireland than in other parts of the British Isles.

 
Bangers and mash

Bangers and Mash

Bangers and Mash is the familiar term for Sausage and Mash, a favourite British and Irish dish. The name bangers is believed to come from the habit of sausages bursting in the pan with a bang if cooked too quickly. Bangers and Mash is quick and easy to make, and also makes a cheap yet very substantial meal. A great favourite with children. Where once it was only possible to buy beef or pork sausages, there are now many different flavours available, from spicy through to fruity. Ask your local butcher for his recommendations.
Course: Sausages
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes
Author: The Cook
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Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 8 thick sausages <em>, beef, pork, or flavoured as you wish </em>

For the mash

  • 900 g potatoes, peeled and quartered
  • tablespoons milk
  • 110 g butter, cubed
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the onion gravy

  • 2 medium onions, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • tablespoons butter
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
  • 700 ml beef stock
  • 4 teaspoon cornflour (cornstarch)
  • 4 teaspoons cold water
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper

Recipe Instructions

  • Heat the oil in a large frying pan, turn the heat to medium and add the sausages. Fry until the sausages are golden brown and firm, turning them from time to time - about 20 minutes. Once cooked place in an ovenproof dish and keep warm until the mash and gravy are ready.
  • Meanwhile start the mashed potato by boiling the potatoes in lightly salted water until soft. Drain, and keep warm until ready to mash.
  • While the potatoes are cooking make the gravy - melt the oil and butter in a large saucepan over a gentle heat. Add the onion and cover with a lid. Cook slowly for approx 10 minutes or until the onions are soft and translucent.
  • Add the sugar and balsamic vinegar to the onions and stir well. Cover with the lid and continue to cook for a further 5 minutes.
  • Add the stock and boil gently uncovered for 5 minutes.
  • In a heatproof jug or bowl mix the cornflour with the cold water to a thin paste. Pour a little of the hot gravy into the cornflour mixture and mix thoroughly. Pour the cornflour mixture back into the gravy, raise the heat to high and boil for 10 minutes or until the gravy is slightly thickened. Keep warm until ready to serve.
  • Finish the mash by placing the milk and butter in the pan used to boil the potatoes, return to the heat and warm gently until the butter has melted.
  • Add the potatoes and mash using either a potato masher, a fork or a potato ricer. Whip the mashed potato lightly with a wooden spoon. Season with salt and pepper.
  • To Serve: Spoon the mash onto 4 warmed dinner plates, place two fat sausages either on the top or at the side of the mash and pour the hot onion gravy over.

Cooks Notes & Variations

There are some who would insist that a meal of bangers and mash is no place for vegetables. To us they are essential and if chosen correctly can add pleasing contrast. Fundamentally this is lazy comfort food. You don't want any vegetables on that plate that you feel you have to tackle rather than eat. You want to be able to shovel, not cut.
Include flavours that augment sausage 'n' mash, but in an easily eaten format: iron-rich brassicas (shredded savoy cabbage, spinach); earthiness (mashed celeriac) and sweetness (shavings of carrot, chopped leeks). Like any meaty, hearty meal (meat and potato pie, Lancashire hotpot), a fragrant, sensitively spiced pile of braised red cabbage on the side, jazzed-up with apple and beetroot, and toggling smoothly between sweet, fruity and sour flavours, is always welcome.
Weirdly, peas should work here, but don't. Likewise sprouts. As for cauliflower cheese, the intermingling of cheese sauce and gravy on a plate ruins both.

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Nutrition

Serving: 0g | Calories: 0kcal | Carbohydrates: 0g | Protein: 0g | Fat: 0g | Saturated Fat: 0g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0g | Monounsaturated Fat: 0g | Trans Fat: 0g | Cholesterol: 0mg | Sodium: 0mg | Potassium: 0mg | Fiber: 0g | Sugar: 0g | Vitamin A: 0% | Vitamin C: 0% | Calcium: 0% | Iron: 0%

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